The Top 15 Movies I Reviewed in 2017!

List by Derrick Carter

Throughout the course of 2017, I posted 206 movie reviews on this blog. Though about a quarter of those were rewatches (covering the SAW and CHILD’S PLAY franchises before their latest installments, and also paying tribute to the passing of genre legend George A. Romero), I managed to catch plenty of fresh new films, forgotten flicks, and classics that I simply hadn’t gotten around to watching. As with last year, 2017’s “Best of” list will cover movies that I watched for the first time in my life. This means that old and new films are on the table, regardless of what year they came out. If a film was new to me and I loved it, then I’m including it with my favorite films that I watched in 2017!

Before I get into my 15 favorite films that I reviewed this year, there are some honorable mentions. I had previously seen THE EXORCIST, NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, THE THING, NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, and ALIENS before this year. Otherwise, they would be on this list. As far as first-time watches, I truly enjoyed the groundbreaking drama MOONLIGHT and adored the 80s throwback STRANGER THINGS. Concerning new horror films, THE EYES OF MY MOTHER seriously disturbed me, THE VOID was a phenomenal Lovecraftian nightmare, and THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS was one hell of a zombie film! WONDER WOMAN also wound up as my second-favorite superhero film of 2017. As for indie thrillers, WIND RIVER was a gripping ride and GOOD TIME was a neon-lit throwback to Martin Scorsese’s early work.

Now, without further ado, onto my top 15 favorite films that I reviewed during 2017…

15. MY FRIEND DAHMER: Most serial killer films focus on chilling murders of their subjects, but MY FRIEND DAHMER is not like most serial killer films. Based on the graphic novel of the same name, MY FRIEND DAHMER is a chilling drama that chronicles the pre-murderous life of Jeffrey Dahmer and examines him as a high school weirdo. By somewhat “humanizing” this psycho, the film doesn’t attempt to elicit sympathy towards its titular cannibal killer and instead shines a light on the fact that people we went to high school might very well turn into monsters seen in news headlines. Though there isn’t a single (human) murder to be found, MY FRIEND DAHMER joins the ranks among the best films about real-life serial killers (MONSTER, ZODIAC, HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER, and THE SNOWTOWN MURDERS).

14. FOUR LIONS: The idea of tackling Islamic terrorism through a darkly comic lens might sound completely misguided on paper, but FOUR LIONS is the best comedy that I sat through all year! The film follows four idiotic would-be terrorists as they attempt to execute a devastating attack, but constantly fumble over their own stupidity and reveal themselves to be bumbling morons. In my opinion, painting Islamic terrorists in this ridiculous light strips some of the power away from them in a similar way to what Charlie Chaplin did to Hitler in THE GREAT DICTATOR or what Rogen/Franco did to Kim Jong-Un with THE INTERVIEW. If you’re down for dark comedy and don’t mind totally offensive punchlines, you should give FOUR LIONS a watch in the near future!

13. HARD BOILED: Last year, LADY SNOWBLOOD wound up being one of my favorite movie-going experiences as I saw it in a packed cinema pub screening. This year, that cinema pub moviegoing experience belongs to HARD BOILED. This shoot ’em up actioner is over-the-top to the point of being ridiculous. Ridiculously awesome! Each gun fight plays out like a carefully choreographed dance and the film features one of the most jaw-dropping single take sequences that I’ve ever laid my eyes upon. Though it relies on a few cop movie clichés, it utilizes these in a loving way that makes the familiar material seem fresh. If you’re into action films and you haven’t seen HARD BOILED, then you need to remedy that immediately!

12. T2 TRAINSPOTTING: In all honesty, I didn’t know what exactly to expect from a sequel to TRAINSPOTTING. I love that film and I know that novelist Irvine Welsh wrote a follow-up novel, but I didn’t know how that might translate into a cinematic sequel. Over two decades after its predecessor’s release, T2 TRAINSPOTTING serves as an amazing companion piece to the original. Using the same cast and experimental visual style (albeit through a much more polished lens), TRAINSPOTTING 2 delivers stellar performances and naturally follows the lives of the four ne’er do wells from the previous film. If you loved the first film, then you’ll probably love this one too. For a full experience, it’s best to watch both of them back-to-back in the space of a single night!

11. NORTH BY NORTHWEST: This may be blasphemy for a cinephile, but I actually haven’t seen many Alfred Hitchcock films. I love PSYCHO, THE BIRDS, and DIAL M FOR MURDER, but the rest of his filmography is basically a mystery to my movie-craving eyes. My first viewing of NORTH BY NORTHWEST took place in the best possible environment (a packed movie theater) and I was blown away by how thrilling this film is. This is basically a James Bond film before Bond ever hit the screen. Cary Grant serves as a charismatic leading man who’s on the run for a murder he didn’t commit. Over the space of his death-defying adventure, we gets lots of suspense, action, and unexpected plot twists. I was on the edge of my seat for this entire film and walked away extremely satisfied. If the rest of Hitchcock’s filmography is anywhere near this great, then I’m in for a real treat as I continue to watch his work.

10. I DON’T FEEL AT HOME IN THIS WORLD ANYMORE: Blending a Coen brothers style of humor with indie thriller sensibilities, I DON’T FEEL AT HOME IN THIS WORLD ANYMORE might just be the most underseen and underrated film of 2017! This movie won an audience award at Sundance and then went directly to Netflix, where some people talked about for a couple of weeks and then it just kind of seemed to vanish out of the public eye. This is a vigilante thriller that’s believable in how inept real-life wannabe vigilantes might be and frequently dishes out shocking spurts of graphic violence. This might be the best Coen brothers film that the Coen brothers never made and I can’t wait to see what first-time director/writer Macon Blair cooks up next!

9. BABY DRIVER: What can I say? Edgar Wright consistently makes great films. BABY DRIVER is a passion project that Wright had in the works for years. In a similar fashion to how George Miller carefully planned out every scene, shot, and effect in MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, Wright constantly lets the viewer know that they’re in the hands of a visionary storyteller. This stylish crime tale about a getaway driver who (ironically enough) wants to get away from his criminal lifestyle is loaded with colorful characters, hilarious humor, and adrenaline-pumping action that’s synced up to one of the best damn soundtracks you’ll hear all year. I gushed over this movie back in June and I am still gushing about it now. If you want a joy ride of pure fun, BABY DRIVER will satisfy your cinematic craving!

8. THE DISASTER ARTIST: Never in a million years did I think that anything to do with Tommy Wiseau’s so-bad-it’s-good THE ROOM would ever wind up on any “Best of” list. Yet, here we are. James Franco lovingly adapts the nonfiction book about the creation of THE ROOM to the big screen in a way that’s not only hilarious, but also genuinely touching. THE DISASTER ARTIST doesn’t take the easy route of being a goofy comedy about a loser who fails so spectacularly that he kind of succeeds. Instead, this film takes a more complicated drama-comedy approach and shows us the more serious side of oddball Tommy Wiseau…and his strange friendship with would-be aspiring actor Greg Sestero. THE DISASTER ARTIST is a moving must-see for ROOM fans and cinephiles who just love great movies in general.

7. BLADE RUNNER 2049: I’m saying it right now, BLADE RUNNER 2049 is one of the best sequels to ever hit the silver screen. Over three decades after its predecessor’s debut, BLADE RUNNER 2049 recaptures the bleak sci-fi/noir spark that made the original into the cult classic that it is today. 2049’s cast all deliver amazing performances across the board, with supporting actors making the biggest impressions in their small minutes of screen time and Ryan Gosling serving as a fascinating new antihero. Besides delivering a complex mystery that unpredictably shifts directions as it goes along, 2049 also has one of the most beautiful romantic subplots in years and it features a literal “one-dimensional” character. For those who were bummed out by this film’s disappointing box office returns, remember that the first BLADE RUNNER was a box office flop and is now considered to be one of the greatest science-fiction films of all time. A similar classic status will undoubtedly follow BLADE RUNNER 2049 in future years!

6. WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES: Seven years ago, if you had told me that a PLANET OF THE APES prequel trilogy would be one of the best cinematic trilogies ever, I would have laughed in your face. It turns out that’s exactly the case though. 2014’s DAWN drastically improved upon the minor flaws of 2011’s RISE, but 2017’s WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES is stellar storytelling from beginning to end. Themes of revenge, survival, and forgiveness are examined throughout the film’s ever-changing plot. Performance wise, WAR fully shapes out intelligent ape Caesar (played wonderfully by Andy Serkis) as animal protagonist who’s more compelling than most human protagonists in films and also introduces Woody Harrelson as a monstrous villain who we want to see die in the most painful way possible. WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES was the best possible way to conclude the APES prequel trilogy and is one of the best summer blockbusters I’ve ever sat through!

5. IRREVERSIBLE: I originally heard about Gaspar Noe’s rape-revenge drama from a podcast in 2008, but hadn’t bothered to give it a look until earlier this year. Though not strictly a horror film by any means, IRREVERSIBLE is a terrifying cinematic experience as events are told backwards. Unlike other linear rape-revenge stories, we see the revenge come first and travel backwards through the moments that eventually lead up to the violent act of justice. As the film plays out in reverse (ironic considering its title), we put pieces of this depressing puzzle together for ourselves and this already tragic event becomes even more tragic with each new revelation. This isn’t a film for the faint-hearted and it’s about as bleak as they come, but IRREVERSIBLE is an uncompromising masterpiece that deserves to be seen by anybody who loves the serious artistic side of cinema!

4. LOGAN: There will never be a better Wolverine than Hugh Jackman. I’m saying that right now. Over a decade has been spent watching Jackman in the role of this weaponized mutant, so LOGAN serves as a suitable final chapter for Jackman’s reluctant do-gooder. The future X-MEN films have a tough act to follow, because LOGAN is a special kind of superhero story. Relationships between the small cast of characters drives the emotional core of this film forward, whilst the R rating finally delivers something that X-MEN fans have wanted to see since 2000: a bad-ass Wolverine slicing and dicing his way through bad guys. This film also has shades of Cormac McCarthy’s THE ROAD crossed with a comic book story that’s about as unconventional as they come. Now that Disney is in talks to own the X-MEN franchise, we likely won’t see another film like LOGAN coming from this mutant-based series. LOGAN is a one-of-a-kind superhero film and one of the best comic book movies ever made!

3. EYES WIDE SHUT: Stanley Kubrick’s final film is an underrated masterpiece about the way in which people delude themselves into believing that they’re happy…and also there’s a creepy sex cult involved too. The entire film has a dream-like atmosphere as we watch the main character (Tom Cruise) venture through a single night odyssey that explores the sexual possibilities of cheating on his wife. Kubrick masterfully shows the dire consequences that might result from following our instinctual desires, whilst also putting us into the place of Cruise’s character. This is especially true of the ending which offers two distinct possibilities: one of them is easy and comforting…and the other one is ambiguous and dangerous. Whatever you might think of it or how you might interpret it, EYES WIDE SHUT is sure to keep you talking about it long after it’s over.

2. YOUR NAME: Eat your heart out Studio Ghibli! YOUR NAME just might be one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever sat through. This film has gorgeous animation from beginning to end, while also delivering an entrancing tale of emotions and body-swapping. It’s initial set-up sounds like the anime equivalent of FREAKY FRIDAY, but drastically becomes something far more charming and moving as its complex plot moves along. This might be one of the strangest love stories ever put to the screen, but its emotional resonance is undeniable! The characters are all built up to the point where the viewer feels for their struggles and deeply cares about them. This makes the film’s final third into a very suspenseful and gripping ride. Also, the climax is utterly perfect. YOUR NAME is a masterpiece and deserves every bit of praise it has received so far (and will continue to receive)!

1. MOTHER!: Much like my favorite film of 2016 (HIGH-RISE), I know that there will be people who loathe and downright detest MOTHER! Some will hate it for its sheer artsy nightmare-logic style and others will despise its controversial message, but I adored every single frame of this fucked-up little ditty. The film follows a woman and her husband in an isolated countryside house. After a strange couple pop in and just decide to stay, their lives are shifted in horrifying ways. I can’t get too into details, because it would spoil some of the film’s nasty surprises and metaphorical madness. I will say that MOTHER! is my favorite horror film of the 2010s so far and one of the ballsiest films to ever receive a nationwide theatrical release. People either really love this film or totally hate it. There isn’t much middle ground to be found and you will likely walk away with a very strong opinion about it. One of the film’s trailers promised that “you’ll never forget where you were the first time you saw MOTHER!” and that statement is completely accurate. I’ve been thinking about this unforgettable horror film since its release and I can’t wait to dive into it again and again in future years to come!

Well, 2017 was a wild year for me…both on this site and in my personal life. I’m currently in the process of moving, so reviews will resume sometime in January! I plan to keep this little movie blog rolling, with plenty of reviews (both old and new) being pumped out on a mostly regular basis! A huge “thank you” to anyone who’s read this blog at all during the past year or any new readers who are discovering it for the first time. There was plenty to love in the world of film during 2017 and here’s to a just as great (if not better) 2018!


Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 43 minutes

MPAA Rating: R for Language throughout and some Sexuality/Nudity

Directed by: James Franco

Written by: Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber

(based on the book THE DISASTER ARTIST by Greg Sestero & Tom Bissell)

Starring: James Franco, Dave Franco, Seth Rogen, Allison Brie, Ari Graynor, Josh Hutcherson, Jacki Weaver, Zac Efron, Hannibal Buress, Andrew Santino, June Diane Raphael, Nathan Fielder, Brian Huskey, Sharon Stone, Paul Scheer & Jason Mantzoukas

Is it possible to make a great movie about the making of one of the worst movies ever made? Well, Tim Burton already did something along those lines with 1994’s ED WOOD. Now, James Franco has done something similar in 2017’s THE DISASTER ARTIST. Based on the non-fiction book of the same name, THE DISASTER ARTIST chronicles the true story behind the making of THE ROOM, which is widely considered to be one of the worst films of all-time. THE DISASTER ARTIST could have been a hilarious romp that mercilessly took down a weird individual and his passion project. Instead, THE DISASTER ARTIST is hilarious, poignant, and heartfelt! This is a movie about following your dreams…even if those dreams fail miserably.

The year is 1998 and the place is San Francisco, California. Greg Sestero (Dave Franco) is a 19-year-old aspiring actor who has trouble emoting in his performances. That all changes when Greg meets strangely accented weirdo Tommy Wiseau (James Franco). Wiseau is fearless in his acting methods, but have a shred of talent in his performances. When Greg and Tommy fail at the seemingly impossible battle to make it big, Tommy decides to write and direct his own movie…with Greg as one of the leading stars. What results is the bafflingly inept production on one of the worst films ever made and a failure so spectacular that it just might be considered a success in its own baffling way.

James Franco has directed films before and none of them seem to be any good. The most recent Franco-directed effort that I sat through was his disappointing adaptation of William Faulkner’s THE SOUND AND THE FURY. I was a bit hesitant that Franco was at the helm of this project, but he thankfully proved all my better judgement wrong. THE DISASTER ARTIST is fantastic and Franco seems like the perfect person to bring it to the screen. Besides the real-world Los Angeles atmosphere that the film evokes, Franco pulls double-duty and plays the role of Tommy Wiseau. To put it bluntly, Franco’s Wiseau impression is pitch-perfect. He has all of the mannerisms down and the unique way of speaking (complete with his unique laugh). Franco nailed this performance!

THE DISASTER ARTIST’s supporting cast sports a bevy of big talent, including Franco’s younger brother Dave in the role of Greg. Though it might be odd to have two brothers acting alongside each other as unrelated characters, this illusion is completely convincing. Dave Franco plays Greg as a level-headed guy who just happens to be friends with the world’s biggest weirdo and has a good heart. Though this film is about the making of THE ROOM, the friendship between Greg and Tommy is the main focus of THE DISASTER ARTIST. Conversations between them range from funny to occasionally intense, as the production brings out serious anger in a few crew members (Greg included).

Other recognizable faces include celebrity cameos and big names in supporting roles. Seth Rogen is especially hilarious as a script supervisor who tries to help Tommy out, but is constantly blindsided by the director’s ego-driven decisions. Paul Scheer is notable as a pissed-off director of photography and really gets his time to shine in the film’s darkest moment (involving an outburst during the filming of one of THE ROOM’s many gratuitous sex scenes). Josh Hutcherson is also quite funny as Philip Haldiman (who played the creepy teenage-ish Denny) and Jacki Weaver gets one great monologue as aged actress Carolyn Minnott (who played Lisa’s cancer-stricken mother).

THE DISASTER ARTIST is likely to win over fans of THE ROOM by injecting some semblance of sense into the sheer incoherence of that film’s final cut. There were lots of scenes in which I immediately thought “Okay, now that part of THE ROOM makes a little more sense.” These moments come as early as the beginning when we see Tommy and Greg watching REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE, admiring one line that gets repeated in one of THE ROOM’s most memorable moments. We also see how certain on-set decisions directly affected the entire flow of that film’s insanity. Why did Mark try to throw someone off a roof? Why did Johnny throw a water bottle in a fit of rage? Why does Tommy Wiseau’s hair look like it’s constantly wet? All of these mysteries and more are answered in the course of THE DISASTER ARTIST’s 103-minute running time.

The biggest reason why THE DISASTER ARTIST works is because it’s a story about somebody following their dreams and doing something they love, even if they are absolutely terrible at it. This film captures the love for THE ROOM, whilst also showing the connection that someone can have with their own artistic material. THE DISASTER ARTIST is sure to delight THE ROOM’s cult crowd, whilst also serving as a fantastic piece of filmmaking for moviegoers who enjoy great dramas and comedies. This film is about friendship, ambition, failure, and unexpected success. THE DISASTER ARTIST is just as genuinely moving as it is hilarious. This is one of the best films I’ve sat through in 2017!

Grade: A+


Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 47 minutes

MPAA Rating: R for Disturbing Images, Language, Teen Drug Use, Drinking and Sexual Content, and for brief Nudity

Directed by: Marc Meyers

Written by: Marc Meyers

(based on the graphic novel MY FRIEND DAHMER by John Backderf)

Starring: Ross Lynch, Alex Wolff, Vincent Kartheiser, Ann Heche, Dallas Roberts, Harrison Holzer, Tommy Nelson & Miles Robbins

MY FRIEND DAHMER is a serial killer film like no other in that we don’t actually see any murders occur on-screen and the plot doesn’t focus on the crimes of its subject. Instead of doing either of those things, MY FRIEND DAHMER is based on the graphic novel of the same name by John Backderf (a.k.a. Derf Backderf). John went to high school with serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and could be considered one of Jeff’s close “friends.” MY FRIEND DAHMER takes the approach of focusing on a pre-murderous Dahmer in his adolescent years, painting a chilling picture of a damaged individual and a psychopath in the making. The result is equally fascinating, chilling, and compelling.

Jeffrey Dahmer (Ross Lynch) is a weird outcast at his high school. This might be because his hobbies include dissolving dead animals in acid at an isolated shed and creepily watching a passing jogger on his everyday runs. In an effort to get Jeff to come out of his shell, concerned father Lionel (Dallas Roberts) destroys Jeff’s dead animal collection and attempts to push his strange son into making new friends. These friends come in the form of amateur artist/bully Derf (Alex Wolff) and his two young cronies. At first, Dahmer seems to be fitting right in…but this future serial killer’s dark thoughts and intentions linger just beneath the surface.

MY FRIEND DAHMER serves as a fascinating prequel to one of the most sickening psychos to ever walk the streets of America. One concern that some people may have is that this film might set out to humanize Dahmer and make him into a somewhat sympathetic creature, despite the fact that he viciously murdered and cannibalized 17 young men. Thankfully, MY FRIEND DAHMER doesn’t try to make you feel bad for its titular monster and it doesn’t celebrate its subject’s life either. Instead, this serves as a creepy character study that gives us a glimpse into this psycho before he started preying upon unsuspecting victims. Dahmer’s verbal clues and disturbing hobbies (like killing animals to relieve stress) contain the films most chilling moments, while there are also loads of dramatic scenes to be found that were ripped right out of this psycho’s strange teenage years. By showing us that Dahmer was indeed an adolescent high school weirdo, the film makes his future crimes seem much more disturbing and horrific in retrospect.

In the titular role, Ross Lynch (who is definitely breaking away from his Disney Channel roots) delivers a fantastic performance. Lynch’s portrayal of Dahmer isn’t necessarily sympathetic in that we feel bad for him, instead it paints the face of a damaged individual who has dark cravings that he will ultimately succumb to. Lynch mainly plays Dahmer as the reserved high school weirdo and occasional class clown. By virtue of the fact that most of us have likely met someone like this teenage version of Dahmer, it makes the entire experience extremely unnerving and yet equally fascinating at the same time.

Even though Ross Lynch pretty much steals the show in the lead role, the supporting cast is remarkably strong. Besides Lynch, the film’s two best performances easily belong to Dallas Roberts as Dahmer’s concerned father and Anne Heche as Dahmer’s mentally ill mother. The verbally abusive bashings between these two get particularly nasty at points. I really sympathized for Dahmer’s father, while his mother just didn’t seem in her right mind and caused her entire family to suffer as a result. Again though, MY FRIEND DAHMER doesn’t attempt to make any sort of excuse for Dahmer’s crimes, but rather to show that he had a rough upbringing (like many other folks who don’t go on to become serial killers and actually make something of themselves).

MY FRIEND DAHMER sort of drops the ball in Alex Wolff’s role of Derf, Dahmer’s “friend.” The emerging relationship between Dahmer and Derf is interesting and the “Dahmer Fan Club” participate in many school pranks to make their high school experience memorable. However, there are brief stretches where Derf seems to almost become the main focus in a film that’s supposed to be about Jeffrey Dahmer’s strange (and foreboding, as most adults seem to ignore early warning signs) teenage life. The final scene between Wolff’s Derf and Lynch’s Dahmer makes the slower moments completely worth sitting through, because those final minutes are haunting beyond words.

MY FRIEND DAHMER is one of the most unusual, fascinating serial killer flicks that I’ve ever sat through. It documents the early years of a real-life psycho, showing his pre-murder progression into madness. In a way, MY FRIEND DAHMER does somewhat humanize Jeffrey Dahmer as a teenage kid…but not to the effect of feeling sorry for him. Instead, it’s the quite the opposite. MY FRIEND DAHMER reminds us that some of the kids we went to high school with could very well be murderous criminals or worse. That effect is chilling and this entire film is haunting. MY FRIEND DAHMER is the scariest serial killer flick that doesn’t contain a single dead human body and that in and of itself is a remarkable achievement. If you are a true crime aficionado, then MY FRIEND DAHMER is a must-see!

Grade: A


Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 2 hours 39 minutes

MPAA Rating: R for Strong Sexual Content, Nudity, Language and some Drug-Related Material

Directed by: Stanley Kubrick

Written by: Stanley Kubrick & Frederic Raphael

(based on the novel DREAM STORY by Arthur Schnitzler)

Starring: Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Sydney Pollack, Marie Richardson, Todd Field, Sky du Mont, Rade Serbedzija, Vinessa Shaw, Fay Masterson, Leelee Sobieski & Alan Cumming

Stanley Kubrick had a long, storied career in cinema. Kubrick is known as one of the greatest directors who ever lived and he also directed three of my favorite films of all-time (A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, THE SHINING, and FULL METAL JACKET). Kubrick’s final film arrived four months after his death, but it’s worth noting that he completed his final cut a mere six days before his passing. EYES WIDE SHUT opened to lots of mixed reception from audiences and polarized critics. Having seen this strange film for the first time, I love it and at the same time know that there’s lots of themes that I haven’t even uncovered yet. Also, this is technically a Christmas movie, so consider this to be 2017’s Christmas review!

Bill Harford (Tom Cruise) and his wife Alice (Nicole Kidman) are part of the upper-crust crowd in New York. After visiting a Christmas party where they both get hit on by other people (Alice by a much older man and Bill by two sexy younger women), Bill and Alice decide to smoke some potent pot. Their casual night of getting stoned results in a heated argument about sex and Alice reveals that she once contemplated cheating on Bill. As a result, Bill goes to take a house call and winds up on a strange night-long journey that takes him into the seediest areas of New York. Curiosity and perversion quickly land Bill in the clutches of a secret society…and he slowly realizes that his life and family may be in very real danger from this mysterious masked group.

As far as the technical side of EYES WIDE SHUT goes, Stanley Kubrick continued to demonstrate his skills as a master filmmaker. The Christmas setting doesn’t just add a touch of irony to the very adult-oriented story, but simultaneously provides an excuse for lots of beautifully lit settings. Apparently, Kubrick used natural lighting and drew off of the many random Christmas decorations for the atmosphere in certain scenes. This colorful effect provides an almost dream-like quality to the entire film that seems appropriate, especially given the surreal nature of the story.

At the time of this film’s production, Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman were married and their chemistry definitely comes across on the screen as the film’s main married couple. Kidman plays her seductive role very well and the viewer never quite knows what she has on her mind, especially during the argument scene that really thrusts Cruise’s protagonist onto his torrid journey across a sex-filled New York. Meanwhile, Tom Cruise almost shows shades of Jack Nicholson in his performance as Bill, especially when he flies off the deep end in moments. Even though Cruise and Kidman clearly have obvious chemistry, there are hints that they are fooling themselves to stay in love. This relationship dynamic directly parallels other (more suspenseful) plot developments and is further highlighted by the film’s title (referring to the willful deception of someone, in this case, these two main characters).

EYES WIDE SHUT’s supporting cast mostly seems like means to an end, but that’s not necessarily a flaw in this film. Each character has a distinct purpose and that purpose benefits the story arc that Cruise’s character ultimately goes through. The fairy tale atmosphere is further heightened by the ridiculous nature of a few of these folks. Alan Cumming is a colorful hotel clerk who delivers verbal clues in a single scene. Rade Serbedzija is a crazy costume store owner, whilst Leelee Sobieski has a soft-spoken part as his promiscuous daughter. Vinessa Shaw has a few minutes of screen time as a prostitute, but makes a big impression. Todd Field plays a loud-mouthed pianist who tempts Cruise to venture further into dangerous territory. Finally, Sydney Pollack serves as Cruise’s best friend and ultimately drives forward the film’s bizarre dialogue-filled finale.

Speaking of the finale, this paragraph may dive into minor spoilers. If you want to go in spoiler-free, then skip to the next paragraph. The final third of EYES WIDE SHUT plays out like a bizarre paranoid thriller and the viewer ultimately doesn’t receive many concrete answers by the conclusion. Instead, Kubrick places us into the exact same position as Cruise’s main character and leaves us to decide if want to accept one explanation over another. There is an explanation given to Cruise’s main character in a speech, but it doesn’t exactly seem completely believable. However, the alternative explanation is far more sinister and leaves vague possibilities open for interpretation. Personally, I choose to go with the latter choice, but some viewers might find themselves frustrated by the ending’s sheer ambiguity.

It goes without saying, but EYES WIDE SHUT is filled with sex. However, Kubrick doesn’t simply focus on the pleasures of sexual acts. He also dives into darker territory. The crazy costume owner and the single-scene prostitute’s storylines are both briefly returned to after the initial night’s journey, with disturbingly tragic results. Also, the masked orgy sequence that earned the film an NC-17 from the MPAA seems far more creepy than it does sexy. Maybe it has something to do with the bizarre masks, but it seems like the unsexiest orgy to ever hit the big screen and that sort of seems to be a point that Kubrick was aiming for in this film.

EYES WIDE SHUT is definitely an acquired taste film. Even diehard Kubrick fans seem split down the middle on whether this is a misunderstood masterpiece or an ambitious misfire. I fall on the side of loving this film. It left me with a lot to think about and the nearly three-hour-long running time rushed by. From a sheer technical standpoint, Kubrick’s directing is flawless in EYES WIDE SHUT. From a narrative standpoint, the ending is unsatisfying in the best possible way (if that makes sense)…as we’re placed into the exact same position as the main character. If you want an unusual Christmas flick for adults or just want to dive into another bizarre journey from one of cinema’s best directors, then definitely give EYES WIDE SHUT a look. Just be prepared for lots of nudity, sex, bizarre moments, and an appropriately uncomfortably brilliant viewing experience.

Grade: A+

GOOD TIME (2017)

Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 41 minutes

MPAA Rating: R for Language throughout, Violence, Drug Use and Sexual Content

Directed by: Ben Safdie & Josh Safdie

Written by: Josh Safdie & Ronald Bronstein

Starring: Robert Pattinson, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Ben Safdie, Barkhad Abdi, Buddy Duress, Taliah Webster & Necro

GOOD TIME is an independent crime-drama that wasn’t exactly a hit at the box office, but made a big impression on the festival circuit. Some folks have even gone as far as to compare this flick to Martin Scorsese’s early work and that comparison is completely valid. Shot in an unconventional style and brimming with seedy plot points, this film might rub certain viewers the wrong way. If you’re a fan of gritty crime-dramas that push the envelope of what is appropriate and dig on arthouse cinema, then GOOD TIME is likely up your alley.

Connie Nikas (Robert Pattinson) wants to make some quick cash by robbing a bank. In an effort to make this seemingly simple job go by as easily as possible, Connie enlists the help of his mentally challenged brother Nick (Ben Safdie, who also co-directed this film) as back-up. The robbery goes wrong and Nick is hauled off to Rikers Island. Worried that his brother won’t survive the night in a holding cell, a desperate Connie scrambles to get together 10 thousand dollars to secure his sibling’s release. This night-long journey puts Connie in some tricky scenarios and forces him to come face-to-face with unsavory individuals as his situation increasingly goes from bad to worse.

When I say that GOOD TIME is shot in an unconventional style, I mean that the Safdie brothers like using close-ups…lots of them. In fact, there are hardly any wide shots or establishing shots to be found in this film. There are a few of both that exist to give the viewer a bearing on where characters are or because an on-screen event requires more visual room, but that’s about it. 90% of this film is told with close-ups on characters faces and items. This style takes a few minutes to adjust to, but has a weird effect of sucking the viewer into the film. This movie’s technical aspects are just as impressive as the gritty race-against-time plot.

Speaking of which, GOOD TIME’s script threatens to become cliched and familiar at any given moment. We have a bank robbery gone wrong. There’s a disabled brother who placed into a dangerous situation. The events unfold over the space of a single night. The protagonist is running from place to place in search of a solution. However, GOOD TIME never once feels predictable or forced in its progression of going from bad to worse to “oh my god, I can’t believe this is happening” and this all makes for one hell of an intense cinematic ride.

Another remarkable quality in GOOD TIME arrives in the form of its protagonist, who one could easily describe as the scum of the earth. Robert Pattinson delivers an amazing performance as Connie, a man who has love for his brother…but it’s the wrong kind of love and his methods of showing it are downright detestable. There are moments where the viewer might almost be able to sympathize for Connie and then Pattinson’s character does something even more repugnant. This character is a dumbass and doesn’t have any redeemable qualities, but he sure makes for an extremely interesting lead and I never got bored while watching him.

This being said, GOOD TIME will likely make every audience member uncomfortable at some given point. There is a specific scene that knocked me senseless in how it progressed and I could not believe that the film went there. It was a disturbing moment that also felt like a bit of harsh realism that’s often passed up in gritty crime stories about trashy gangsters, run-down neighborhoods, and bad situations. You’ll know the scene that I’m talking about if/when you see this movie. Also, Ben Safdie’s portrayal of Connie’s mentally challenged brother (complete with a mumbled voice and slack-jawed appearance) doesn’t feel the least bit exploitative. That in and of itself is an impressive feat and his final on-screen moment is emotionally sound.

If there are any complaints to be found in GOOD TIME, it’s that the film has one flashback that feels completely unnecessary and briefly breaks the flow of following Connie’s neon-lit quest through New York’s scummy side. Put that one sequence aside and pretty much everything else about GOOD TIME blew me away. If you’re into gritty crime-dramas that make you want to take a shower afterwards, you’ll find an uncomfortably effective experience in GOOD TIME. If you appreciate unconventional filmmaking, you’ll love the technical craft of GOOD TIME. Finally, if you devour great pieces of cinematic art, you’ll find that GOOD TIME is actually a great time!

Grade: A

Blog at

Up ↑